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Pros and Cons of Being a Kidney Donor

If you are thinking of being a kidney donor then this is a very serious decision to make. On the one hand you will be saving someone's life, and that is a great feeling that will make a huge different to you and to them and their family. However at the same time it is not a decision to take lightly as it will mean going through a serious operation that carries risks, and losing something that was once a part of you. So how do you make the decision? Here we have taken the liberty of listing some of the pros and cons for you, read on…

The Pros of Being a Kidney Donor

Kidney donors are amazing people who have given perhaps the greatest gift they can give to someone – one of their very own organs. Of course right away this is one of the strong 'pros' of kidney donation – you are doing a great and kind thing for someone that will literally save their life and this will fill you with a great sense of satisfaction and happiness most likely. If you have every given to a charity or donated blood then you will have surely noticed how good it made you feel – but that's nothing compared to how much better it will have made the recipient feel. At the same time it is also a pro that you will not feel the guilt of someone's life weighing heavily on you should you think of it seriously then decide not to go ahead with it.

You will be treated most likely as a hero and you may well get a lot of gratitude. The hospital staff are also likely to treat you very well and to recognise what a serious decision this has been.

The Cons of Being a Kidney Donor

However surgery is not something that you should go into lightly, and any operation includes risks. Complications are rare, but they do happen and you will likely need to sign a disclaimer before you go ahead. You should discuss these potential difficulties with your doctor before deciding to go ahead to ensure you are aware of the risks involved. At the same time this will mean that the build up to the operation carries with it a lot of anxiety and nervousness that can be distracting and this can be unpleasant in itself. The surgery will also be quite painful afterward, and you will most likely have to take time off work – perhaps one to two weeks – in order to recover fully. Make sure that you are able to do this and if you can't take paid leave, that you are financially able to cover the costs.

Finally you might not always feel you get the thanks you deserve and you might feel that you are due more gratitude. This can lead to resentment and bitterness so it is important that you address he reasons that you are going through with the procedure before you do – ensure that they are all entirely altruistic and that you are not going ahead with it in order to get praise and adulation but rather to help someone.





Gary Wickman

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  • Comment #1 (Posted by an unknown user)
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    I wanted to know more specific health "cons" of donating a kidney.
     


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