AuthorDr. Anna Kaplan

Dr. Anna Kaplan graduated with a BA in English literature from Pomona College in 1975. She received her MD from U.S.C. School of Medicine in 1979. A three-year residency (training period) in family practice followed, and she was certified by the American Board of Family Physicians in 1982. She recertified, a normal procedure, in 1988 and 1995. She retired from active practice after 15 years, but keeps up with medicine via continuing medical education. Dr. Kaplan has written in the medical field for both consumers as well as professionals. She has also authored hundreds of articles on other subjects.

Influenza: Symptoms, Diagnosis, and Treatment

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The word “flu” is often used very casually. People say they had the flu, or the stomach flu, or “some kind of flu is going around.” Actual influenza usually makes people sick enough that it is clearly something different. If you did not get the influenza vaccine as flu season begins and you get sick, how will you know it is the flu? Most people who actually have it know...

Influenza – The Virus and the Vaccine

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Many people don’t give any thought to influenza, commonly called the flu, but they should. True influenza is a highly contagious, viral illness that can cause epidemics, severe disease, and even death. Once you have had it, you will remember, and will probably want the vaccine before the next influenza season. Influenza is believed to have been infecting people for 2500 years, since the ancient...

Fall Prevention in the Elderly

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Fall Prevention in the Elderly Preventing Older People From Falling at Home Many older people are at risk of falling in their own homes. Those that do have a serious fall, especially if they suffer a broken bone or other significant injury, do not ever completely recover. An accident of this kind can start an older person on a downward spiral which can include loss of independence, the need for...

What Is Pertussis and Why Do You Need the Vaccine?

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Pertussis is the scientific name for whooping cough, a respiratory infection that causes the most serious illness in infants. It was a common and sometimes fatal disease as recently as the first half of the 20th century. A pertussis vaccine was first put into use in the United States during the 1940’s, leading quickly to a decrease in the number of cases, from 156 per 100,000 people to less than...

What Does Lactose Intolerance Mean?

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Lactose intolerance refers to the symptoms experienced by people taking in milk products who cannot digest milk sugar properly. Lactose, the scientific name for milk sugar, contains glucose and galactose. The enzyme lactase, in the lining of the small intestine, is supposed to break lactose down into these two sugars, which are then easily absorbed. Without enough lactase, lactose cannot be split...

How Much Exercise Do I Need? (Adults aged 18-64)

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There is abundant evidence about the benefits of exercise for people of all ages. Exercise improves cardiovascular health, bone strength, and reduces the risk of heart attacks, strokes and even a number of cancers. It decreases obesity as well as the risk of developing diabetes and all its complications. It improves stamina and mood. People who exercise regularly live longer. No one should be...

What Is Osteoarthritis?

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Osteoarthritis (OA), sometimes called “wear-and-tear” arthritis, or degenerative joint disease, is the most common cause of joint pain in adults. More than 25 million people in the United States have already been diagnosed with osteoarthritis, and as the population ages, increasing numbers are expected to suffer from the symptoms of this disease. It is very likely that anyone who...

What Is Celiac Disease?

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Celiac disease (CD), also sometimes called gluten intolerance or non-tropical sprue is a condition in which a person’s intestines cannot digest part of the protein in wheat, as well as similar proteins in other grains including barley and rye. This causes a number of symptoms in “classic” cases of celiac disease. Symptoms include abdominal pain, cramps, bloating, and diarrhea. Instead...

Learning About Food Allergies

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Who has food allergies? Food allergies are an increasingly common problem all over the world. As many as 6% to 8% of children in the United States may be food allergic. While many allergies are outgrown, those to certain foods including peanuts and shellfish tend to persist into adulthood. Three to 4% of adults have food allergies. The numbers of allergic individuals are continuing to rise. In...

Dr. Anna Kaplan

Dr. Anna Kaplan

Dr. Anna Kaplan graduated with a BA in English literature from Pomona College in 1975. She received her MD from U.S.C. School of Medicine in 1979. A three-year residency (training period) in family practice followed, and she was certified by the American Board of Family Physicians in 1982. She recertified, a normal procedure, in 1988 and 1995. She retired from active practice after 15 years, but keeps up with medicine via continuing medical education.

Dr. Kaplan has written in the medical field for both consumers as well as professionals. She has also authored hundreds of articles on other subjects.