How to Recover From a Big Night Out

H

Do you remember when you were in your late teens or early twenties? If you were like many people, then you will have gone out regularly to party, danced all night, had huge amounts to drink and then hit the sack at 4am or even later (or earlier…).

Back then you were probably able to do this multiple times a week and not really feel too many negative side effects. While you might have felt a bit hung over in the morning, you’d have nevertheless been able to get up at a reasonable time still and complete a day’s work. You certainly would have been fine two days later.

These days though, it’s a different story – and we’re often still running on near-empty come Monday because of a night out on Friday. Once you start approaching your thirties and beyond, you have to begin planning in advance whenever you’re invited on a night out. No longer can you just throw yourself in head first: now you need to think about whether you can afford to be that tired on Monday and you need to think about how you’re already feeling. It’s miserable to be quite honest…

Fortunately though, it is possible to be a little more impulsive with your nights out again and to not pay for them days later. The secret is in knowing how to recover from a big night quickly and to get your energy levels back to normal as fast as possible. Read on and we’ll look at some of the best strategies for improving your recovery after a big night so that you can enjoy a better balance between your work life and social life.

Get Plenty of Sleep

After a big night out, you’ll be affected by two different things: hangover and sleep deprivation. If you were up boogying all night until the break of dawn, then understandably you’re probably going to be somewhat sleepy. The solution is to make sure you catch up on that deficit on the weekend by sleeping extra so your body has time to recover. This will also minimize the effects of the hangover.

But Sleep at the Right Times

While getting extra sleep is important, you don’t want to overdo it by sleeping in until 2pm the next day. Why? Because doing so will only mean that you then struggle to get to sleep at a reasonable time again the next night – ultimately meaning that you get less sleep again and put yourself back in a sleep-deprived state.

The day after your big night out, give yourself a lie-in but don’t sleep past 10am. Now go to bed at a reasonable time and make sure that you get your full 8 hours of ‘normal’ sleep that night.

Have a Bath

A nice warm bath is a great way to start the day. This will help you to rid you of stress and will help to relax your muscles. If you were cutting shapes until late last night, then you will probably have aching legs and joints all over. A nice warm bath is the easiest way to address this and to feel calm and rested again.

Drink

Following your big night out, drinking lots of water is very important. One of the main reasons we feel so rough after drinking large amounts is that alcohol is a diuretic and leads to dehydration. This leads to headaches, cramping and general lethargy. The solution then is simply to drink plenty the next day so that you restore all of your fluids.

Eat

Eating lots is also important. This will replenish your blood sugar levels and it will give your body the raw materials it needs to make repairs. You might not feel much like eating, but you should make an effort nonetheless if you want to be back to normal as soon as possible.

Go Outside

Going outside will help in several ways. Fresh air will help invigorate you while the sun will help you to readjust your body clock helping you to get good sleep the next night again. If you stay indoors and slob in front of the TV, you will only prevent yourself from feeling tired later on and probably feel even more cooped up and lethargic. Head out for a walk and you’ll clear your head and help your body to recover.

Last Updated on

About the author

Adam Sinicki
Adam Sinicki

Adam Sinicki is a full time writer who spends most of his time in the coffee shops of London. Adam has a BSc in psychology and is an amateur bodybuilder with a couple of competition wins to his name. His other interests are self improvement, general health, transhumanism and brain training. As well as writing for websites and magazines, he also runs his own sites and has published several books and apps on these topics. He lives in London, England with his girlfriend and in his spare time he enjoys climbing, travelling, playing games, reading comics and eating sandwiches.

Add comment

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

Adam Sinicki By Adam Sinicki

Adam Sinicki

Adam Sinicki

Adam Sinicki is a full time writer who spends most of his time in the coffee shops of London. Adam has a BSc in psychology and is an amateur bodybuilder with a couple of competition wins to his name. His other interests are self improvement, general health, transhumanism and brain training. As well as writing for websites and magazines, he also runs his own sites and has published several books and apps on these topics. He lives in London, England with his girlfriend and in his spare time he enjoys climbing, travelling, playing games, reading comics and eating sandwiches.